This week at The Avid Listener: Joanna Smolko, “Springsteen and Human Rights: ‘Chimes of Freedom’”

Last week, on the night before the national election, Bruce Springsteen performed at a final Hillary Clinton rally. During the performance, he said “The choice tomorrow couldn’t be any clearer. Hillary’s candidacy is based on intelligence, experience, preparation, and an actual vision of America where everyone counts.”

This week’s essay by Joanna Smolko is about Springsteen’s struggle with Bob Dylan’s legacy, how Springsteen builds on that legacy to support progressive agendas, and how his commitment to progressive movements hasn’t wavered. Posting this now is certainly bittersweet. But we at TAL are committed to social justice, broadly defined, and we continue to hope. So this week’s essay reminds us that progression is a long game, dependent on stamina, not sprinting. And we can count on at least some musicians to give voice to the cause.

Here’s an excerpt:

“Since the beginning of his career, Springsteen has been haunted by his label as “the next Dylan.” Though promoted by John Hammond at Columbia Records (as Dylan had been), and admiring Dylan greatly (as he recently articulated while reflecting on Dylan’s 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature), Springsteen consciously chose to distance himself from Dylan’s musical style and forge his own path as a songwriter, embracing instead a carefully orchestrated, hard-rocking sound. In a 1999 interview withMark Hagen, Springsteen recounted that in his early twenties he began to avoid writing lyrics that relied on loosely strung-together images, a stylistic feature that was emblematic of Dylan’s music. However, from the late 1970s on, Springsteen covered songs written by Dylan, perpetuating—purposefully or not—the link between his work and that of Dylan.”

You can read the entire essay here. There’s more to come.

The Avid Listener: Listen, Write. Discuss. Repeat.

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